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Analysis of trends in higher education applications, admissions, and enrolments

Publication type
Independent Commission on Fees. (2014) Analysis of trends in higher education applications, admissions, and enrolments . Analysis of trends in higher education applications, admissions, and enrolments, ( ). pp. 1-32.

Abstract

This report follows on from the Commission's previous report on applications and acceptances to higher education in the UK. The previous reports, based on data from the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS), highlighted a number of concerns about the possible impact of the 2012-13 changes to university fees. This current report shows that application rates for 18 year olds in England have continued to recover from their depressed level in 2012, with rates in 2014 1.9 percentage points above their 2010 levels. The proportion of the 18 year old population taking up places at university has also recovered in all countries of the UK. Numbers of applications and acceptances by mature students have also recovered slightly but remain substantially lower than their pre-2012 levels, particularly in England. In 2014, numbers of English residents aged 20-24 and 25+ applying to university were 8 per cent and 11 per cent below their 2010 levels, respectively. Mature student numbers also remain substantially depressed in terms of the take up of university places. Eighteen per cent fewer people aged 25+ took up places in 2013 than did in 2010. Enrolment figures for the 2012-13 academic year (relating to the 2012 applications cycle) show that the year of the fee changes saw particularly large reductions in the number of mature students entering part-time courses. Over 100,000 fewer students over the age of 25 started part-time higher education courses in 2012-13 than did in 2009-10, a reduction of 43 per cent. This was part of a more general decline in part-time higher education, with 41 per cent fewer part-time enrolments overall in 2012-13 than in 2009-10. Provisional figures highlighted by Universities UK suggest that this decline has continued in the most recent academic year.
Publication type:
Report
Theme(s) and sub-theme(s):
Student experience > Cost of study, living and financial support
Authors:
Independent Commission on Fees
Publication title:
Analysis of trends in higher education applications, admissions, and enrolments
Official URL:
Reference number:
HEER000496
Summary deposited on:
14 Aug 2014
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